The Piobaireachd Society
Patron HM The Queen

News

Piobaireachd Society Bursary 2017 – closing date extended to 31st May

The closing date for this week of tuition at the College of Piping has now been extended to 31st May. The bursary aims to encourage young pipers who do not have easy access to a piobaireachd teacher to learn piobaireachd. Previous successful candidates were very positive about their experience o...

Piobaireachd on Radio

Pipeline  Cabar Fèidh Gu Brath (Roddy MacLeod),  Queen Elizabeth II Salute (Niall Stewart), Cronin Padruig Seamus (Finlay Johnstone), One of the Dead's Lament (Patrick Molard) Hihorodo hiharara cherede cherede (Jack Taylor) Phantom Piper of Corriearyk (Gordon Walker) Fhailt Na Misk (Patrick Molar...

What tune is this?

Can anyone identify this tune? The player is Iain Macfadyen.  Answers here please.  Tune name will be announced.  No prizes except the warm glow. [audio mp3="http://www.piobaireachd.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Iain-MacFadyen-tune-unknown.mp3"][/audio]...

“New” Tunes from the Campbell Canntaireachd

Recordings of 2 "new" tunes from the Campbell Canntaireachd have been added. One of the Dead's Lament (Patrick Molard). Hirododo hiharara cherede cherede (Jack Taylor). These tunes had not previously been available in staff notation.  Scores are now published in "Pipers Meeting, New Tunes...

The Kings Taxes – in all its moods.

The Kings Taxes is set for the Gold Medal this year.  Have a listen to these newly posted recordings of William MacLean, Andrew Pitkeathly and Murray Henderson, all with their individual stamp and showing different interepretations and moods of this favourite masterpiece. Contrast these with those ...

Set Tunes 2018

THE PIOBAIREACHD SOCIETY SET TUNES FOR 2018 The Piobaireachd Society recommends the following lists of tunes for competitions in 2018: A. SENIOR COMPETITIONS Mrs Smith's Salute PS 9 The Red Hand in the MacDonalds' Arms PS 10 Good Health to You Donald PS 13 Sir James MacDonald of the Isle...

 

Welcome

When the Highlands and Islands of Scotland adopted the bagpipe, perhaps some six hundred years ago, they began to develop the instrument and its music to suit their needs and tastes.

What emerged was the instrument we know today as the Great Highland Bagpipe, and a form of music, piobaireachd (pronounced Pee-broch), which is unique to the instrument.  The music consists of a theme (ground) and variations on this theme.  The theme can express joy, sadness, or sometimes in the “gathering” tunes , a peremptory warning or call to arms.

The theme is developed in a series of variations, which usually progress to the “crunluath” variation, where the piper’s fingers give a dazzling technical display of embellishment or gracenotes.

The Piobaireachd Society was founded in 1901 to encourage the playing teaching and study of this music.