The Piobaireachd Society
Patron HM The Queen

Welcome

Cairn (1)

Piobaireachd on Radio

Pipeline  War or Peace (Jack Lee),  Farewell to the Laird of Islay (Finlay Johnstone),  ...

Set tunes 2016

The set tunes for 2016 are now available here. Score for the MacDonald's Salute Thank you to Colin MacLellan for providing the definitive score for The Phantom Piper of Corriearyk and a recording of its composer, his father, John MacLellan playing it. Notes on 2015 Senior Tunes   ...

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Annual Conference 2016 report

Thank you to Robert Wallace, Piobaireachd Society Vice President, for this report about the Annual Conference which took place in Birnam Hotel Dunkeld at the weekend. The full details will be recorded in the Conference Proceedings in due course....

Archie Kenneth Quaich Results

Archie Kenneth Quaich 2015 The 23rd annual Archie Kenneth Quaich competition for amateur piobaireachd players was held in the Royal Scottish Pipers' Society rooms in Edinburgh on Saturday 7 March.   The competition is sponsored by the Piobaireachd Society.   The Archie Kenneth Quaich was won,...

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Notice of AGM Sunday 22 March

Notification is given to all members of the Piobaireachd Society that the 2015 Annual General Meeting will take place on Sunday 22 March during the Annual Conference at the Birnam Hotel, Dunkeld.  Please let the secretary know of any items for the agenda of the AGM.   The minutes of the 2014 AGM ...

When the Highlands and Islands of Scotland adopted the bagpipe, perhaps some six hundred years ago, they began to develop the instrument and its music to suit their needs and tastes.

What emerged was the instrument we know today as the Great Highland Bagpipe, and a form of music, piobaireachd (pronounced Pee-broch), which is unique to the instrument.  The music consists of a theme (ground) and variations on this theme.  The theme can express joy, sadness, or sometimes in the “gathering” tunes , a peremptory warning or call to arms.

The theme is developed in a series of variations, which usually progress to the “crunluath” variation, where the piper’s fingers give a dazzling technical display of embellishment or gracenotes.

The Piobaireachd Society was founded in 1901 to encourage the playing teaching and study of this music.