The Piobaireachd Society
Patron HM The Queen

News

Archie MacNeill the Blind Piper

The talk about Archie MacNeill the Blind Piper given at the 2012 conference by Dugald MacNeill is now available for members. ...

Archie Kenneth Quaich 2013 Results

Alan Forbes, secretary of the music committee, who organises the competition writes Archie Kenneth Quaich 2013 The 21st Archie Kenneth Quaich competition for amateur piobaireachd players was held in the Royal Scottish Pipers' Society rooms in Edinburgh on Saturday 2 March.   The competition ...

New tunes for non members

New tunes for those who are not members of the Piobaireachd Society have been put into the "Listen" section....

Names of Tunes in the Nether Lorn Manuscript

Some thoughts about tune names in the Nether Lorn Manuscript (Campbell Canntaireachd) by Ronald Smith.  Ronald Smith is an amateur piper who learnt from Dr. Roderick Ross, Hugh MacCrae, Donald MacMillan, Malcolm MacPherson, Robert Nicol, and James MacGregor....

 

Welcome

When the Highlands and Islands of Scotland adopted the bagpipe, perhaps some six hundred years ago, they began to develop the instrument and its music to suit their needs and tastes.

What emerged was the instrument we know today as the Great Highland Bagpipe, and a form of music, piobaireachd (pronounced Pee-broch), which is unique to the instrument.  The music consists of a theme (ground) and variations on this theme.  The theme can express joy, sadness, or sometimes in the “gathering” tunes , a peremptory warning or call to arms.

The theme is developed in a series of variations, which usually progress to the “crunluath” variation, where the piper’s fingers give a dazzling technical display of embellishment or gracenotes.

The Piobaireachd Society was founded in 1901 to encourage the playing teaching and study of this music.