The Piobaireachd Society
Patron HM The Queen

Piobaireachd Society Annual Conference

Saturday/Sunday 25/26 March
Birnam Hotel, Perth Road, Dunkeld, Perthshire PH8 0BQ.

For Bed and Breakfast and conference dinner book direct with the hotel on  01350 728030 or online.

  • Angus McKay revisited - Robert Wallace
  • CLASP - Margaret Dunn, Gordon Hislop, Gill Cairns.
  • New Tunes from the Campbell Canntaireachd - Patrick Molard, Jack Taylor.
    Includes book launch of 45 unpublished tunes.
  • Fiddling and Piobaireachd - Pete Clark
  • Set Tunes demonstration - John Frater, Peter McCalister, Bill Wotherspoon
  • Dinner and Ceilidh

For further information contact Roderick Livingstone, Treasurer:
Email: roddy66@gmx.com
Telephone: 07801 014885

Pay via Paypal:

News

The Fairy Flag

A recording of John Macfadyen playing The Fairy Flag has been added. He plays the version which existed previous to that in book 16, which is an edited version....

New recording of Massacre of Glencoe in Donald MacDonald style

Very many thanks to Roddy MacLeod for giving us permission to publish this recording of his performance of the Massacre of Glencoe at the Donald MacDonald Cuaich competition this year. This adds to our growing collection of recordings illustrating this way of playing.  ...

A Piper’s Farewell to his Pipes

Thank you to Steven Knox for sending his composition A Piper's Farewell to his Pipes.  He says that this tune seeks to express the feelings of a piper who is no longer able to play, as he puts his pipes back in their box for the last time.  As in some other laments, grief is mixed with frustration...

 

Welcome

When the Highlands and Islands of Scotland adopted the bagpipe, perhaps some six hundred years ago, they began to develop the instrument and its music to suit their needs and tastes.

What emerged was the instrument we know today as the Great Highland Bagpipe, and a form of music, piobaireachd (pronounced Pee-broch), which is unique to the instrument.  The music consists of a theme (ground) and variations on this theme.  The theme can express joy, sadness, or sometimes in the “gathering” tunes , a peremptory warning or call to arms.

The theme is developed in a series of variations, which usually progress to the “crunluath” variation, where the piper’s fingers give a dazzling technical display of embellishment or gracenotes.

The Piobaireachd Society was founded in 1901 to encourage the playing teaching and study of this music.