The Piobaireachd Society
Patron HM The Queen

Annual Conference 2018

Saturday/Sunday 24/25 March
Birnam Hotel, Perth Road, Dunkeld, Perthshire PH8 0BQ.

The College of Piping Lecture "The 51st (Highland) Division during WW1" by Colin Cambell, military historian, is on Friday evening 23 March in the same venue. www.collegeofpiping.org 0141 334 3537. Tickets £10 including refreshments

For Bed and Breakfast and conference dinner book direct with the hotel on 01350 728030

Day rate including tea/coffee with lunch £45 - if attending Saturday only or both days.
Day including tea/coffee without lunch £25 - if attending Saturday only or both days.

  • CPA presentation - Glenn Brown and pipers.
  • Beyond the Performer Audience, through Progressive Programming - John Mulhearn
  • Descent and evolution in Ceòl Mòr – reflections - Hugh Cheape, Decker Forrest.
  • RCS students
  • Set Tunes 2018 demonstration - Robert Frater, Decker Forrest, Robert Wallace, Jack Taylor
  • Dinner and Ceilidh

For further information contact Roderick Livingstone, Treasurer:
Email: roddy66@gmx.com
Telephone: 07801 014885

Pay via Paypal:

News

Archie Kenneth Quaich Entries

THE ARCHIE KENNETH QUAICH COMPETITION The twenty-fifth annual amateur Piobaireachd competition for the Archie Kenneth Quaich will take place on Saturday, 4th March 2017, in the rooms of The Royal Scottish Pipers' Society, 127 Rose Street Lane South, Edinburgh, starting at 10am. Entries and enq...

New Sidelights to Kilberry Book

The new combined edition of Sidelights on the Kilberry Book is now available price £15.  Available from The College of Piping and The National Piping Centre The book consists of Archibald Campbell of Kilberry's notes on 60 tunes, 10 of which have not been published before.  The new tunes are...

Mary’s Praise – Alternative Settings

Mary's Praise is set for the Gold Medals this year. It has been written in many different ways other than how it appears in Piobaireachd Society book and the Kilberry book.  Peter McCalister looks at some of these here....

 

Welcome

When the Highlands and Islands of Scotland adopted the bagpipe, perhaps some six hundred years ago, they began to develop the instrument and its music to suit their needs and tastes.

What emerged was the instrument we know today as the Great Highland Bagpipe, and a form of music, piobaireachd (pronounced Pee-broch), which is unique to the instrument.  The music consists of a theme (ground) and variations on this theme.  The theme can express joy, sadness, or sometimes in the “gathering” tunes , a peremptory warning or call to arms.

The theme is developed in a series of variations, which usually progress to the “crunluath” variation, where the piper’s fingers give a dazzling technical display of embellishment or gracenotes.

The Piobaireachd Society was founded in 1901 to encourage the playing teaching and study of this music.