The Piobaireachd Society
Patron HM The Queen

News

Centenary of Army Class

The Piobaireachd Society started the first Army piping class on 15 October 1910 with John MacDonald of Inverness as the first instructor. Almost to the day, 100 years later, on 16 October 2010, a "Piobaireachd for Pleasure" open afternoon was held at the Army School of Piping in Inchdrewer House Ed...

Talk about Campbell Canntaireachd

During the Piping Live festival in Glasgow, there was a talk on "The Quest - the Search for the Lost Volume of the Campbell Canntaireachd" at the Piping Centre in Glasgow. The talk was light-hearted and informative, explaining what the Canntaireachd is, with 2 tunes being played in full by Derek ...

 

Welcome

When the Highlands and Islands of Scotland adopted the bagpipe, perhaps some seven hundred years ago, pipers began to develop it and its music to suit their needs and tastes.

What emerged was the instrument we know today as the Great Highland Bagpipe, and a form of music, piobaireachd (pronounced ‘pee-broch’).

Piobaireachd is unique to this instrument. It cannot be successfully reproduced on any other. (The name piobaireachd is literally ‘piping’ in Gaelic.)

This classical pipe music consists of a theme, known as the ground, or in Gaelic the urlar (‘oorlar’), and variations on this theme.

The theme can express joy, sadness, or sometimes, in the ‘gathering’ tunes, a peremptory warning or call to arms.

Variations on the theme usually progress to the ‘crunluath’ variation, where the piper’s fingers give a dazzling technical display of embellishments or gracenotes.

The Piobaireachd Society was founded in 1901 to encourage the playing teaching and study of this music.