The Piobaireachd Society
Patron HM The Queen

News

Unpublished Campbell Canntaireachd Tunes played by Patrick Molard

Four unpublished tunes from the Campbell Canntaireachd were played by Patrick Molard at the Piobaireachd Society Conference in 2012.  Members can hear three of these - A Glas  Nameless 16 V1  and White Wedder Black Tail  and see the other presentations at the Conference. Next year's confer...

Conference Report 2012

Annual Conference Report 2012 The annual conference was held in the Birnam hotel on 24/25 March. This proved a successful venue – easy transport links, excellent comfort and service, and a splendid conference hall with a high arched ceiling making for a first class pipe acoustic. And pipes were h...

Archie Kenneth Results

The results of the Archie Kenneth Quaich which took place in the Royal Scottish Piper's Society Rooms on 3rd March 2012 are as follows 1. John Frater                The Old Men of the Shells 2. Tom Peterkin             Salute to Donald 3. Eric McKimmon     ...

Stories of 2012 Set Tunes

Senior Tunes  The Finger Lock This tune is credited to Ronald MacDonald of Morar (c.1700). One story suggests that Calum Mac Raibert was sent by the Earl toMullto learn the pipes from a master player. Calum was young and careless, and he was rather stiff-fingered. However after learning this ...

 

Welcome

When the Highlands and Islands of Scotland adopted the bagpipe, perhaps some seven hundred years ago, pipers began to develop it and its music to suit their needs and tastes.

What emerged was the instrument we know today as the Great Highland Bagpipe, and a form of music, piobaireachd (pronounced ‘pee-broch’).

Piobaireachd is unique to this instrument. It cannot be successfully reproduced on any other. (The name piobaireachd is literally ‘piping’ in Gaelic.)

This classical pipe music consists of a theme, known as the ground, or in Gaelic the urlar (‘oorlar’), and variations on this theme.

The theme can express joy, sadness, or sometimes, in the ‘gathering’ tunes, a peremptory warning or call to arms.

Variations on the theme usually progress to the ‘crunluath’ variation, where the piper’s fingers give a dazzling technical display of embellishments or gracenotes.

The Piobaireachd Society was founded in 1901 to encourage the playing teaching and study of this music.